Message Recipient Psychological Characteristics: Incurious and Curious Motives to Learn about Health Risks

For reprints and preprints of the latest advances in theory and research on the I/D Model and related topics, click the links below. For relevant scales, click on the Psychometric Instruments link in the menu bar.

Message Recipient Psychological Characteristics: Incurious and Curious Motives to Learn about Health Risks
This paper reviews important connections between inquisitiveness and coping with the stress of potential health threats.

Litman, J. A. (2017). Message Recipient Psychological Characteristics: Incurious and curious motives to learn about Health Risks. In: R. Parrot (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Health and Risk Message Design and Processing. New York: Oxford University Press

Curiosity and Crisis over the Lifespan

For reprints and preprints of the latest advances in theory and research on the I/D Model and related topics, click the links below. For relevant scales, click on the Psychometric Instruments link in the menu bar.

Curiosity and Crisis over the Lifespan

Working with colleagues in the UK, we’ve found evidence that curiosity is more frequently experienced and expressed during times of personal turmoil, suggesting it may play a key role in responding to uncertainty during stressful periods in one’s life.

Robinson, O.C., Demetre, J., & Litman, J.A. (2017). Adult life stage and crisis as predictors of curiosity and authenticity: Testing inferences from Erikson’s lifespan theory. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 41, 426-431

Epistemic Curiosity and Self-Regulation

For reprints and preprints of the latest advances in theory and research on the I/D Model and related topics, click the links below. For relevant scales, click on the Psychometric Instruments link in the menu bar.

Epistemic Curiosity and Self-Regulation

My colleagues and I have been exploring the relationships between I- and D-type EC and self-regulation. We find that I-type EC involves optimism, taking risks and having fun while learning, while D-type EC involves caution, deliberation and thoughtfulness in seeking knowledge. In short, it appears that I-type EC orients individuals towards carefree forms of intellectual exploration, whereas D-type EC orients individuals to utilize their cognitive resources more judiciously.

Lauriola, M., Litman, J. A., Mussel, P., Desantis, R., Crowson, H.M., & Hoffman, R.R. (2015). Epistemic curiosity and self-regulation. Personality and Individual Differences, 83, 202-207.

The Development of Epistemic Curiosity in Young Children

For reprints and preprints of the latest advances in theory and research on the I/D Model and related topics, click the links below. For relevant scales, click on the Psychometric Instruments link in the menu bar.

The Development of Epistemic Curiosity in Young Children

My latest findings based on collaborative work with colleagues in the Netherlands on the development of epistemic curiosity in children ages 3 – 8. This is part of a larger longitudinal study currently in progress.

Piotrowski, J.T., Litman, J.A., & Valkenburg, P. (2014). Measuring epistemic curiosity in young children. Infant and Child Development, 23, 542-533.

ID EC scale for Young Children (ID-YC)